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Skin Cancer Treatment

Timely treatment to get your skin back on track

A swifter journey to skin cancer treatment

Discovering you have a suspect or malignant mole can be daunting. It’s good to know that most skin cancers, when found early, can be successfully treated.

MoleMap’s world-first early detection system and 25+ years of unrivalled experience means a prompter path to treatment (and less time to worry). With minimally invasive to more advanced treatments for skin cancer available, our friendly and compassionate team will guide you on your journey.

full body checkup

Find your nearest MoleMap skin cancer treatment clinic

Clinics in Australia

Brighton

Partner clinic
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Our partner clinics undergo MoleMap accredited training. Using our proven skin surveillance system, they deliver the same high-quality report and dermatologist diagnosis.
Suite 14, 3 Male Street, Brighton VIC 3186
Services offered
Full Body MoleMap
Full Body MoleMap
SkinCheck
SkinCheck
SkinCheck+
SkinCheck+
Skin Cancer Treatment
Skin Cancer Treatment

Carlton

Partner clinic
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Our partner clinics undergo MoleMap accredited training. Using our proven skin surveillance system, they deliver the same high-quality report and dermatologist diagnosis.
237a Faraday St, Carlton VIC 3053
Services offered
Full Body MoleMap
Full Body MoleMap
SkinCheck
SkinCheck
SkinCheck+
SkinCheck+
Skin Cancer Treatment
Skin Cancer Treatment

Geelong

Partner clinic
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icon
Our partner clinics undergo MoleMap accredited training. Using our proven skin surveillance system, they deliver the same high-quality report and dermatologist diagnosis.
275 Ryrie Street, Geelong VIC 3220
Services offered
Full Body MoleMap
Full Body MoleMap
SkinCheck
SkinCheck
SkinCheck+
SkinCheck+
Skin Cancer Treatment
Skin Cancer Treatment

Find the right skin service for you

Surgical

The main treatment for skin cancer is surgery, particularly in advanced skin cancer. The lesion and some of the surrounding tissue is removed, usually under local anaesthetic. This is a quick and painless procedure with minimal scarring.
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MoleMap AU Skin Check Services

Topical

Some skin cancers can be treated with topical medications. These creams and ointments, typically applied daily for several weeks, are designed to destroy the cancerous cells without harming healthy cells.
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Skin Cancer Treatment

Cryotherapy

Pre-cancerous lesions and some small basal and squamous cell carcinomas may be treated with cryotherapy.  Liquid nitrogen is applied to the lesion to freeze and kill abnormal skin cancer cells and create a wound. This promotes the formation of new, healthy skin cells.
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full body molemap service

Photodynamic therapy (coming soon)

This treatment uses a cream medication that’s activated by special light. Applying bright light activates an immune response within the body, attacking the abnormal cells. It is used to treat sunspots, superficial basal cell carcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas.
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full body molemap service

Saving lives. One skin check at a time

Helena Alemao Testimonial
Brent Griffin Testimonial
Lewis Testimonial
Helena Alemao
Helena Alemao
45 years old
High Risk
“When dad was suddenly diagnosed with melanoma I had to be proactive about my own skin.  My Full Body MoleMap resulted in 39 moles being documented and sent for dermatologist review.”
Family history
Fair Skin
Many Moles
Brent Griffin
Brent Griffin
59 years old
High Risk
“A suspicious mole was picked up during my Full Body MoleMap. A few days later I had a phone call from my doctor…I was told it was Clark level 2 melanoma.”
Atypical moles
Lewis
Lewis
71 years old
High Risk
“At my annual full body skin exam, the melanographer found a small pin-sized spot on my ear and recommended I have it examined further. It turned out to be cancerous. If it wasn’t for MoleMap, it would have gone unnoticed.”
Changing mole

Peace of mind in 3 steps

Step 1: Comprehensive skin check

The first step in skin cancer protection and prevention is to get a thorough head-to-toe skin check. This will help detect any signs of skin cancer early.
mole check

Step 2: Dermatologist review

Your dermoscopic images are reviewed by a melanographer and then sent for further dermatologist diagnosis. You’ll get a report within days outlining which, if any, moles need investigation.
SkinCheck

Step 3: Know your treatment options

If therapy is required, our team will refer you for treatment and answer any questions or concerns you might have.
patient report

Helping you spot skin cancers early

  • Consultant dermatologists highly experienced in skin cancer diagnosis
  • World-class Melanographers that check skin all day, every day
  • Clinicians with extensive training in detecting and treating cancers
Leyla Nsar
Lead Melanographer
Registered Nurse

Leyla Nsar

Lead Melanographer
Registered Nurse
Dr. John Levy

A/Prof. Dr John Levy

Skin Cancer Doctor
MBBS, BSc, FRACGP, FARGP
Dr. Simon Tucker

Dr Simon Tucker

Dermatologist
MB ChB, FRCP(UK), FACD

Together, we can put a stop to skin cancer

Your questions, answered

How can I reduce my risk of melanoma to avoid cancer treatment?

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Overexposure to the sun is a key cause of melanoma. A key thing to remember is that UV damage over time all adds up, increasing the risk for skin cancer later in life. This is why regular skin checks at a trusted skin cancer clinic are essential. However, there are other risk factors to be aware of too. To find out your individual risk, take our quick risk check quiz.

Are there side effects to skin cancer treatments?

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There are different types of treatment for skin cancer, so the side effects may vary. For example, minor surgery for cancers that have not spread can be performed quickly, under local anaesthetic. In this case, any side effects are likely to be minimal. You may experience mild pain, swelling or bruising and a small scar.

The most common side effect of photodynamic therapy is sensitivity to light. This may cause some itching or burning on the skin. You may also notice redness or rash. Avoiding sunlight and using a cold-water spray or local anaesthetic may help alleviate these symptoms.

Potential side effects of cryotherapy may include mild soreness and blistering prior to a crust forming on the wound. The skin may also appear lighter or darker in the treated area. Side effects may be different depending on which parts of the body are undergoing treatment, as some areas are more sensitive.

Will I be given aftercare instructions?

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Yes, as part of your treatment consultation your doctor will advise on the potential side effects and how to care for your skin after treatment.

Taking good care of your skin can support wound healing and your general health. In some cases, the skin may feel itchy. Try not to scratch as this may slow the healing process and increase the risk of infection.

Following surgical skin cancer treatment, it’s important to keep the wound clean and follow the advice provided by your medical professional. Watch out for bleeding and signs of infection.

How do I protect my skin after skin cancer treatment?

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A previous history of skin cancer puts you at higher risk of developing more skin cancers. It’s important to regularly check your skin to spot any changes early. Your doctor will advise how often a professional skin check is needed (i.e. every 3, 6 or 12 months).

It’s also important to check your own skin with regular (at least every 3 months) DIY skin checks. The best time to per­form your skin self-examination is before or after a shower. Make sure you’re in a well-lit room and have a hand-held mirror (for the tricky to see spots).

Start at the parts of the body that are easy to see. Check your arms and tor­so (both sides) and go all the way down to your feet. Don’t forget to check the soles of your feet and your toes. Exam­ine the area under your armpits, the pubic area, and the genitals for strange growths. Look at your palms, backs of hands and between your fin­gers (not forgetting the fingernails). Using your mirror, check for signs of skin can­cer on the neck, back and but­tocks. Ask your partner, a family member or friend to exam­ine your head.

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